The acquittal of Donald Trump in the left’s second impeachment attempt is significant. For a number of reasons. First, it frees Trump to continue a political career, perhaps the presidency again, if he chooses to. It also means his name has been cleared, giving him more ammunition to go after Democrats, should he help Republicans get elected in 2022.

It also casts a strong light on those Republicans who abandoned the party to vote against Trump. Many legal experts explained this second impeachment was unconstitutional from the state. House Democrats rushed the process, refusing to hold an investigation. By the time it reached the Senate, Trump was already out of office.

Most Republicans (in both the House and Senate) voted against this sham. But seven Republican senators voted to convict, despite the flimsy case and lack of evidence. Did these swamp dwellers think they were going to get away with this?

Six of the seven Republican senators who voted to convict former President Trump in his impeachment trial have now been rebuked in their home states, either by party organizations or grassroots voters.

First among the anti-Trump 7 to be repudiated back home was Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy. The Louisiana GOP voted unanimously to censure Cassidy on the same day the Senate voted on the single article of impeachment the Democrat-controlled House passed shortly after the Jan. 6 breach of Capitol Building…

On Sunday, the Lincoln County Republican Party unanimously adopted a resolution to censure Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse, who makes no secret of his disdain for Trump and his America First movement…

Maine’s Sen. Susan Collins is the only one of the seven GOP defectors to escape rebuke — for now. The state’s GOP county chairs did not issue a statement after meeting remotely on Monday night, however one county party chair told The Bangor Daily News that a state party meeting to address censure “is likely to come by the end of the month.” [Source: Just the News]

Louisiana’s Bill Cassidy was immediately censured by his home state after his vote. Pennsylvania Republicans censured Pat Toomey for his vote—and are discouraging Republicans from donating to him and are demanding he return campaign funds.

Lincoln County Republicans censured Ben Sasse, a longtime critic of Trump and top swamp dweller. The North Carolina Republican Party held an emergency vote this week just to censure Richard Burr, who voted against Trump despite previously voting to dismiss the entire trial.

And renowned Trump hater, Mitt Romney, faces mounting pressure from Utah conservatives for their state to censure him. The only one not to face backlash at the moment is Maine’s Susan Collins, who won re-election by the skin of her teeth. One state party member said a meeting to discuss her censuring will come by the end of the month.

It’s remarkably clear that Republicans across the country have vastly different priorities than those people who “represent” them in D.C. State Republicans strong backed Trump in 2020—and did not jump on the impeachment bandwagon, when so many of their counterparts in D.C. did. The fact that just seven Republicans broke from the party this way is reason to push back. Right now, these Republicans are facing censure. But the consequences might be must worse, as time progresses.

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